“The Heart of a Leader”

Here is a powerful message from highly acclaimed leadership expert Ken Blanchard from in his best-selling book “The Heart of a Leader”:

In my travels, I’ve seen a lot of unmotivated people at work, but I’ve never seen an unmotivated person after work. When five o’clock rolls around, people race from the office to play golf or tennis, coach Little League, and pursue other pastimes. People are motivated to do things that provide them with feedback on results. Feedback is important to people. We all want to know how well we’re doing. That’s why it is essential for an effective performance review system to provide ongoing feedback.

Too often managers save up negative information and unload it all at once after a minor incident or during the annual performance review session. Others “whitewash” performance reviews and act like everything is OK when it really isn’t. When people are attacked or not dealt with truthfully, they lose respect for their organization and pride in their work.

I firmly believe that providing feedback is the most cost effective strategy for improving performance and instilling satisfaction. It can be done quickly, it costs nothing, and it can turn people around fast.

Lead Well … Lead Right,

 

The Heart of a Leader

Insights on the Art of Influence
Book Image

Learn More

Tags: , , , , ,

Leadership Solution: The Power of Teamwork

Teamwork is a function of cooperation, precision and commitment. And, if you have ever seen the Blue Angels in action, you will clearly agree with the importance of these principles. Here is the introduction from The Power of Teamwork by Scott Beare who for four years was a pilot for the Navy’s world renowned Blue Angels.

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT

Excerpted from The Power of Teamwork: Inspired by The Blue Angels

Introduction

You stare through a gold tinted visor, as sweat stings your eyes and blurs your vision. Over the background engine and airflow noise, you hear through your headset, “Up we go, a little more pull!” as you ease back on the stick in the $30 million high performance jet fighter you’re flying.

Your eyes remain glued to the formation of five other aircrafts merely inches away; your ears are tuned in to every word and syllable spoken. Years of training and preparation have taught you to rely on all your senses to make continuous corrections and maintain control of the aircraft as it exceeds 400 miles per hour.

Your muscles become fatigued from fighting the 35 pounds of force you are countering on the stick, and the fluctuations of the g-force imposed on your body throughout the show. You cannot let up. You must burn through the ever present distractions and sensations.

The physical strain doesn’t compare to the mental exertion required. Your blue flight suit is soaked with perspiration from the intense focus required to perform and survive. The aerial maneuvers you perform in a six-plane formation, wing-tip to wing-tip, exceed what other aerobatic pilots struggle to perform solo.

Most people think of the Blue Angels team as six shiny blue and gold F/A-18 Hornets that take to the skies, thrilling millions. But, like all successful organizations, what goes on behind the scenes is what drives the Blue Angels’ success. The dedication of the support personnel and maintenance crew is what keeps these high performance machines in the air.

While I enjoyed the rewards that come with being a Blue Angel pilot, numerous other men and women with advanced skill sets sacrifice countless hours on the road, away from their families, to ensure the team’s success.

To see these dedicated professionals in action, day after day, represents the truepower of teamwork.

The Power of Teamwork

Inspired by The Blue Angels

Book Image

SPECIAL OFFER: Was $15.95 Now Only: $11.95

Until Midnight, April 17, 2012

Learn More

Tags: , , , ,

Daily Quote: Knowledge

“Knowledge is the only instrument of production that is not subject to diminishing returns.”

~J.M. Clark

Today’s Quote comes from the book:

144  Ways to Walk the Talk

144 Ways To Walk The Talk

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Stop with Unproductive and Pain in the @%& Meetings

Let’ face it virtual, face-to-face, team and large group meetings are parts of our everyday work life.  And, all too often they are disorganized, lack a particular purpose and are generally a waste of time.

Here is the “Meeting Magic” formula that will help you and others turn your meetings into product endeavors.

M+A+G+I+C = Success

Meet or Not?  -  Determine whether or not a meeting is the best way to accomplish your goal.

Agenda:  -  With the end in mind, prepare carefully to get what you want.

Guidelines: – Set and follow “the rules” that will allow you to conduct the meeting with confidence.

Involvement:  Participate and encourage others to do the same. (That is, after all, why you have meetings.)

Clarity:  Communicate clearly to help ensure success!

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT

Today’s Leadership Solution is from:
The Secrets of Meeting Magic Book Image

Special Offer: $8.00
(Original Price $10.95)
Expires: November 11, 2011

Learn More

Tags: , ,

Stop with Unproductive and Pain in the @%& Meetings

Let’ face it virtual, face-to-face, team and large group meetings are parts of our everyday work life.  And, all too often they are disorganized, lack a particular purpose and are generally a waste of time.

Here is the “Meeting Magic” formula that will help you and others turn your meetings into product endeavors.

M+A+G+I+C = Success

Meet or Not?  -  Determine whether or not a meeting is the best way to accomplish your goal.

Agenda:  -  With the end in mind, prepare carefully to get what you want.

Guidelines: – Set and follow “the rules” that will allow you to conduct the meeting with confidence.

Involvement:  Participate and encourage others to do the same. (That is, after all, why you have meetings.)

Clarity:  Communicate clearly to help ensure success!

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT

Today’s Leadership Solution is from:
The Secrets of Meeting Magic Book Image

Special Offer: $8.00
(Original Price $10.95)
Expires: November 11, 2011

Learn More

Tags: , ,

How to Attract and Retain “Winners”

How to Attract and Retain “Winners”

Retaining, attracting and hiring the best, brightest and most productive people is not an easy task for leaders and their organizations. Even in situations where there is a vast supply of candidates both internally and externally, there are also a high percentage of individuals that do not have the capability, commitment or chemistry to match your culture or your organizational objectives.  Therefore, it is essential that leader take the time to both attract the best candidates and even more importantly, retain your “best and brightest.” Here are a few tips from the bestseller 180 Ways to build a Magnetic Culture for your consideration:

  • Don’t let performance appraisals get in the way of performance feedback! Regardless of the effectiveness and frequency of your formal performance appraisal process, “people management” is an ongoing process of feedback, recognition, and coaching – with LOTS of opportunities occurring on a daily or weekly basis.

 

  • Invest in education. Devoting time and resources to developing people (and yourself) will provide significant and sustained bottom-line results. When you deal with many competing priorities, it’s often easy to adopt a “we’ll do it tomorrow” perspective. But as we all know, sometimes tomorrow never comes!

 

  • Make new-hire orientation a recruitment strategy. Yes, you’ve already attracted and selected these folks. But remember that they have friends and professional associates. How they’re treated at every stage of employment – particularly, their initial experience with you – can influence their willingness to “market” your organization to others.

 

  • Draw a line in the dirt and stop hiring (and promoting) individuals who don’t clearly demonstrate their beliefs and behaviors regarding values such as integrity, respect, responsibility, etc. Don’t fall into the “Belief trap” that you can train for these characteristics at some later date. It rarely happens!

 

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT

Today’s Leadership Solution is from:
180 Ways to build a MAGNETIC CULTURE Book Image

Practical “How To’s” For Retaining, Attracting, and Hiring The Best, Brightest, and Most Productive People

Learn More

Tags: , , , , ,

Don’t Reward Non-Performance

When people continually mess up certain jobs, many leaders give up and reassign those tasks to someone they can trust. Pretty soon, one or two trustworthy (and overloaded) people are doing all the work – while everyone else is coasting. Don’t let that happen on your team!

Insist that all of your people meet all expectations for all facets of their jobs. Coach, advise, and teach – but hold people accountable and responsible for doing their jobs. Keep the workload fair and evenly assigned.

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT

Today’s Leadership Solution is from:
Solving Performance Problems Book Image

A Common Sense Guide for Leaders at ALL Levels

Learn More

Tags: , , , , , ,

Don't Reward Non-Performance

When people continually mess up certain jobs, many leaders give up and reassign those tasks to someone they can trust. Pretty soon, one or two trustworthy (and overloaded) people are doing all the work – while everyone else is coasting. Don’t let that happen on your team!

Insist that all of your people meet all expectations for all facets of their jobs. Coach, advise, and teach – but hold people accountable and responsible for doing their jobs. Keep the workload fair and evenly assigned.

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT

Today’s Leadership Solution is from:
Solving Performance Problems Book Image

A Common Sense Guide for Leaders at ALL Levels

Learn More

Tags: , , , , , ,

Solving People Problems at Work

If it hasn’t happened yet, sooner or later it will: you’ll be faced with a team member who does something disruptive, violates a rule, is chronically late, or just fails to get the job done. He or she has a performance problem – you have a “people problem.” And, like it or not, you must deal with it.

Fact is, most leaders are not comfortable addressing performance and behavior issues. That’s easily understood. “People problems” are stressful, and many folks in leadership positions don’t have the training and experience needed to deal with them. Let’s face it, nobody wakes up thinking, “Oh good … I get to go in and tell someone they have a problem, today.” Instead, we worry about it. We dread it. And sometimes, we look for every excuse to avoid it altogether. But you and I both know that doing nothing rarely gets us the results we’re looking for. Bottom line: you have to address and resolve issues … you have to talk them through. And it’s those problem-solving discussions for which most people tend to need the most help.

One of the most common concerns expressed by leaders involves the discussion opening. “I’m not sure how to get the conversation going. What should I say to get started?” If you share that same concern, the excerpt below should prove helpful. It’s from my new “Just In Time” handbook, Solving People Problems At Work. Read it … give it a try … share it with your colleagues. This stuff really works!

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT

Like Solving People Problems at Work on FacebookGoogle Plus One Button
Share on:


Excerpt from Solving People Problems At Work by Steve Ventura

To be sure, the first few seconds of the conversation are critical to your ultimate success – they affect the kind of response you’ll get from the person.

Avoid beginning with you statements like, “You have a problem” or “You’ve been making a lot of people mad lately … including me!” While those words may be true, they also tend to make people anxious and very defensive. Instead, use a non-accusatory, tactful opening that asks the individual for his or her cooperation:

I need your help to solve a problem.

Most people will respond with an “Okay” or “Sure” or “What’s the problem?” Now, it’s imperative to avoid any long-winded speeches intended either to prove you are in the right or to sugarcoat the issue. Get right to the problem at hand.

In a non-judgmental, non-accusatory mode, identify the problem – the specific behavior that was (or still is) at issue. Describe …

1. What the person did or didn’t do;
2. When it happened;
3. What resulted – what the negative impact was or could have been.

Then, seek an explanation with an open ended question like What happened? or What’s going on? 

Today’s Leadership Solution is from:
Solving People Problems At Work

Book Image

Tags: , , , , ,

Together we can make a difference

At 211 degrees water is hot. At 212 degrees, it boils. And with boiling water, comes steam. And steam can power a locomotive. The one extra degree makes the difference. This simple analogy reflects the ultimate definition of excellence.

Please take a moment to watch 212° the extra degree,
a little movie you’ll never forget

212 Movie

If you like this video clip, I encourage you to share it with the world and join us on our mission to empower and inspire millions of people around the globe. At the end of this video you’ll see simple instructions on how you can help.

Together we can spread words of Encouragement, Inspiration & Empowerment one video at a time… and wouldn’t you agree our world could use a little more positivity these days?

Together we can make a difference!

Tags: , , , , ,