180 Ways to Effectively Deal With Change,

In the powerful  “How To” Handbook 180 Ways to Effectively Deal With Change,  author Laurie Calzada has put together a great compliment of tips and techniques for dealing with that big fat “change monster.” Here are a few of those “ways” for your consideration:
#1. FOCUS ON PAST RESULTS. Write down several benefits of change that you have experienced in the last year. Review your list periodically as a reminder of how change has been beneficial for you and the organization.
#71. STOP THE WHINING! Nobody likes to hear a complainer. When change has become inevitable, complaining becomes wasted energy. Tell people to take that energy and channel it toward improving the situation.
#152. BE UPBEAT AND POSITIVE. You are your best cheerleader. “It isn’t if you win or lose, but it is how you play the game.” If your team is losing the game, you still have to cheer them on. If you stop cheering, your team just may stop trying.
Lead well … LEAD RIGHT,

Today’s Leadership Solution is from the book:

180 Ways to Effectively Deal With Change

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Leadership Solution: Peer Today, Boss Tomorrow

Let’s face it, we have all gone thru some tough economic times and business uncertainties these past few years. This has caused us to get leaner, meaner and work even smarter!  However, one of the “good news” outcomes that’s happened is a growing “promote from within” perspective occurring in a vast array of organizations. What that does is create opportunities for people inside their organizations and also ensures a higher predictability of success for those being promoted to higher levels of responsibility.
Moving from Peer to Boss has many challenges but there are some definite characteristics that will ensure a new leader will be the kind of leader that others – including former peers – will want to follow. Please take a few moments to read the excerpt below from Peer Today, Boss Tomorrow: Navigating Your Changing Role, a powerful Walk The Talk “How To” Handbook.

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT

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Excerpted From Peer Today, Boss Tomorrow

10 Ways to Be the Kind of Leader That Others
– Including Former Peers –
Will Want to Follow:
1. TREAT EVERYONE WITH DIGNITY, RESPECT, AND COURTESY. Value the inherent worth of each person you have contact with. Appreciate the fact that others’ dreams, goals, and feelings of self worth are as important to them as yours are to you. Adopt the mindset that being “a superior” does not mean that you are superior … and behave accordingly!

2. LEAD BY EXAMPLE. Model the work performance, attendance, and conduct that you expect from others. Show people, through your daily behaviors, what it means to have integrity, a strong work ethic, and an unyielding commitment to your organization’s mission and values. WALK THE TALK!

3. BE FIRM, FAIR, AND CONSISTENT. Avoid playing favorites. Hold everyone – including yourself – equally accountable for following ALL rules and regulations, exhibiting appropriate behavior, meeting ALL job responsibilities, and achieving desired results.

4. “OWN UP” TO YOUR SHORTCOMINGS. Avoid cover ups. If you make a mistake, admit it … and then fix it! If you don’t know something, admit it … and then find out about it! And, if you’re holding an employee accountable for a wrong doing that you, yourself, committed in the past – and he or she calls you on it – respond with: “That’s true. I did do that. And I was wrong, back then … just like you’re wrong, now.”

5. FOCUS ON THEIR SUCCESS. Provide everyone on your team with the information, direction, resources, feedback, and support they need to be successful. Create/seize opportunities for team members to learn, grow and develop. Be a teacher … be a coach.

6. GET THEM INVOLVED. Whenever practical and appropriate, involve direct reports in decision making, plan development, and problem solving. Solicit their suggestions, ideas, and options. Delegate tasks and responsibilities – along with the commensurate authority.

7. LISTEN. Hone your listening skills. Focus on understanding the messages your team members (and others) send to you. Demonstrate, by your listening behaviors, that you care what others think, feel, and have to say.

8. SHOW YOUR APPRECIATION. Acknowledge and thank employees for their efforts and contributions. Let team members know that good work is truly important – and that good workers are valued and appreciated. Celebrate achievement!

9. RESPECT THEIR TIME. Remember that your team members have important (often difficult) jobs to do and priorities to manage. Don’t expect them to drop whatever they’re doing every time you want something or whenever you feel the need for a meeting. Be a help, rather than a hindrance, when it comes to employee time management.

10. DO WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE. When you see or hear of something that requires attention, jump in and deal with it. Don’t procrastinate or offer excuses for not dealing with issues – especially those that are difficult or distasteful. No one wants to follow a leader who shies away from the tough stuff and fails to take care of business.

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Some “Just In Time” Tips

Getting everyone on board, focused and working towards the achievement of common goals can be challenging for leaders of all levels. Ultimately, however, it boils down to turning our good intentions into predictable day to day practices. Here are a few “Just In Time” tips for you and your leaders to consider:
  • Teach Business Literacy. One powerful way to build employee commitment is to teach them the business of the business. The more people understand how your organization operates, the better they’ll be able to contribute to your overall mission and the bottom line … and feel like they truly are a part of your success.
  • Address Performance Problems Early.One of the surest ways to damage commitment is allowing some people in your group to get away with sub-par work. When that happens, others have to pick up the slack. You owe it to the rest of the team to address an employee’s deficiencies as soon as you become aware of them. Waiting only increases the intensity of everyone else’s bad feelings.
  • “Spread the Wealth.” Rotate drudge work so that everyone shares part of that routine, less exciting load. Likewise, spread around the high-profile assignments so that each team member has an occasional opportunity to strut his or her stuff.
  • Grow the Job to Grow the Person.Once someone has mastered a job, look for ways to increase their responsibilities and the depth of their tasks. And by all means, involve them in that process. If the job is not expanded – or if there is no challenge to stretch and grow – employees are more likely to become complacent and less committed.
  • Obliterate Their Obstacles. Ask each member of your work group to identify the three most significant obstacles that negatively affect their performance (e.g., faulty equipment, a shortage of needed supplies and information, unclear instructions, prohibitive or obsolete procedures, etc.). Create a master list and start working to eliminate as many of them as you can. Remember that it’s much easier for employees to get and stay committed when they don’t have to “Fight the system” in order to do a good job!

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT

Just In Time Collection

Special Offer: Was: $34.95 Now Only: $29.95

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Contains All 6 “Just In Time” Books:

  • Building Commitment At Work
  • Getting Good At Getting Along
  • Solving People Problems At Work
  • Getting Good At Communicating
  • Making The Most of Mentoring
  • Getting Good At Getting Organized

Offer Ends February 7, 2012

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Some "Just In Time" Tips

Getting everyone on board, focused and working towards the achievement of common goals can be challenging for leaders of all levels. Ultimately, however, it boils down to turning our good intentions into predictable day to day practices. Here are a few “Just In Time” tips for you and your leaders to consider:
  • Teach Business Literacy. One powerful way to build employee commitment is to teach them the business of the business. The more people understand how your organization operates, the better they’ll be able to contribute to your overall mission and the bottom line … and feel like they truly are a part of your success.
  • Address Performance Problems Early.One of the surest ways to damage commitment is allowing some people in your group to get away with sub-par work. When that happens, others have to pick up the slack. You owe it to the rest of the team to address an employee’s deficiencies as soon as you become aware of them. Waiting only increases the intensity of everyone else’s bad feelings.
  • “Spread the Wealth.” Rotate drudge work so that everyone shares part of that routine, less exciting load. Likewise, spread around the high-profile assignments so that each team member has an occasional opportunity to strut his or her stuff.
  • Grow the Job to Grow the Person.Once someone has mastered a job, look for ways to increase their responsibilities and the depth of their tasks. And by all means, involve them in that process. If the job is not expanded – or if there is no challenge to stretch and grow – employees are more likely to become complacent and less committed.
  • Obliterate Their Obstacles. Ask each member of your work group to identify the three most significant obstacles that negatively affect their performance (e.g., faulty equipment, a shortage of needed supplies and information, unclear instructions, prohibitive or obsolete procedures, etc.). Create a master list and start working to eliminate as many of them as you can. Remember that it’s much easier for employees to get and stay committed when they don’t have to “Fight the system” in order to do a good job!

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT

Just In Time Collection

Special Offer: Was: $34.95 Now Only: $29.95

Book Image

Contains All 6 “Just In Time” Books:

  • Building Commitment At Work
  • Getting Good At Getting Along
  • Solving People Problems At Work
  • Getting Good At Communicating
  • Making The Most of Mentoring
  • Getting Good At Getting Organized

Offer Ends February 7, 2012

Learn More


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Inspired to Lead

Every once in a while, as I’m reading, I come across a piece that is so powerful and thought provoking, I feel the need to share it – as is. No description … no explanation … no reinforcing of the message … no lesson from me. Just put it out there and let it speak for itself. Today is one of those times.

The “piece” I have to share with you is the “Closing Thoughts” from Christopher Novak’s masterpiece book Inspired To Lead.
I encourage you to read it, remember it, and share it with your fellow leaders.

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT

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Closing Thoughts From Inspired To Lead

Leadership is not a top-down impulse but rather a bottom-up impact. The greatest leaders in history have not been dictators but rather directors – leadership maestros who used their gifts of vision, values and purpose to orchestrate actions that served a cause greater than themselves.

Giving orders is not leadership. Giving hope is. Leaders who serve the interests of those they lead earn far more than the obedience of their followers, they earn their respect.
Are you an inspired leader? It is good to reflect on how well we are living up to our own leadership challenges. How well are you serving your team and your organization? When was the last time you asked the people you lead how well you are meeting their professional needs? When was the last time that you took a few minutes to sit with each of your team members and asked them what you can do better to help them be more effective or more satisfied in their work? Have you ever asked your colleagues how you can inspire them to excel? Go ahead, ask the questions and do not fear the answers.
Inspired leadership is not about weak and strong; it’s about right and wrong. It’s about doing things the right way, for the right reasons and using your position of power, trust and influence to serve. Serve as a facilitator to get things done. Serve as a mentor to grow your team members. Ultimately, the most inspired leaders serve as an example to others that the pinnacle of leadership is reached when you care more about others standing atop the summit than you do about your own view.

Inspired To Lead

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12 Powerful Lessons on Making a Difference

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