Who Is Responsible For “Stuff” Around Here?

Dear Friends,

Sure, leaders are supposed to take the lead and set the example … top management has a big responsibility for practicing what the organization preaches. But that responsibility extends to managers, supervisors, team leaders, and individual contributors as well. Just as civil laws are intended for more than only lawmakers, religious principles apply to more than just religious leaders, and family rules are meant for more than just parents, workplace goals and objectives are relevant for more than just management. They’re everyone’s responsibility.

Lead Well … Lead Right,

 

Walking The Talk Together

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Continuous improvement

Continuous improvement is a wonderful objective, but it must be backed up with actions and behaviors. Here are three success tips from the “How To” Handbook 180 Ways to Ensure Your Success … And the Success of Your Organization:

1. Prioritize your work. Start with what’s important and urgent; then do what’s important, but not urgent; next do what’s not important, but urgent (meaning it has a deadline to act). What are left should be time-wasters that don’t require action at all.

2. Go beyond your defined job. If you are able to do more than is assigned or expected, take the plunge and get it done. This is a great way to expand your horizons and increase your value as a team member and employee.

 

3. Measure performance and analyze results. Look for patterns of success, and determine the contributing factors that can be replicated elsewhere. Be sure to include those involved with the areas being measured – and use this as an opportunity to celebrate their successes.

Lead Well … Lead Right,

Today’s Leadership Solution is from:

180 Ways to Ensure Your Success …
And the Success of Your Organization

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Leadership Solution: Leadership Behaviors

In order to be a true leader, you must do the things that leaders do … and you must do them well. Here are some of the leadership behaviors you need to adopt:

Accept that your results now come through others. As a leader, your primary job is not to do the work, but rather to direct, encourage, support, and develop the people who do. Their successes are your successes … and their failures are yours as well. You’ll no longer be judged merely by what you accomplish individually. Your satisfaction must come from – and your reputation must be built on – what your people achieve. You shine when THEY are the ones in the spotlight.

Be a leader – not a “boss” or a “pal.” Your people don’t want to be bossed and they undoubtedly have more than enough friends. If you’re looking to get the most and best from your group, don’t be a dictator or a chum – be a LEADER who motivates, inspires, and models top-notch performance and conduct.

Let them know how they’re doing. Providing specific, detailed feedback needs to be an ongoing process rather than a once-a-year event. The more employees know how they stack up against your expectations, the easier it is for them to keep their performance on track.

Do right by those who do right. When team members do what you want them to do – when they meet your expectations or go above and beyond the call of duty – there ought to be something in it for them. Of all the activities you engage in as a leader, “catching people doing things right” – and recognizing them for it – needs to be one of your top priorities.

Explain “why’s” as well as “what’s.” It’s VERY important for your people to know why things need to be done. It helps them feel like valued members of the organization. And when the why’s make good sense (which they usually do), it increases employee commitment and dedication to the tasks at hand.

Deal with performance problems early. Make and take the time to deal with performance discrepancies as soon as you become aware of them. Work through any fear, anxiety, or discomfort you may have. The earlier you address issues, the easier and less emotional they will be to handle for everyone involved.

Set the example and the tone. Regardless of what appears on job descriptions or in employee handbooks, your behavior is the real performance standard that team members will follow. They’ll rightfully assume it’s okay and appropriate to do whatever you do. Why wouldn’t they? So it’s critical that you set the proper example and desired tone … that you model the performance and behavior you expect from others.

Keep your commitments. Don’t make promises lightly … don’t make ones you can’t (or don’t intend to) keep … don’t BS the people who ultimately will determine your success. And when you do make commitments, write them down, check them frequently, and do whatever it takes to make good on them.

Embrace diversity. Work on maximizing your respect for diversity and insist that each member of your teams does the same. Appreciate individuals who are “different” – especially those of other races, cultures, creeds, and national origins. Fact is, it’s the legal thing to do … it’s the moral thing to do … it’s the smart thing to do.

Lead Well … Lead Right,

Lead Right

Every Leader’s Straight-Talk Guide to Job Success

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How to Deliver Best-in-Class Customer Service

Dear Friends,

I am sure that everyone reading this has a story or two they can tell about unforgettable Customer Service, whether it be memorable positive experiences or “I can’t believe that really happened” Customer Service catastrophes. We not only remember these incidents but usually share them with many others.

In Mac Anderson’s book Customer Love: Great Stories About Great Service, he shares 22 engaging Customer Service stories from Best-in-Class individual and organizational Customer Service Providers. One of my favorites is about L.L. Bean and their stated customer service philosophy:

At L.L. BEAN a Customer is…

The most important person ever in this company – in person or by mail.

Not dependent on us, we are dependent on him.

Not an interruption of our work, he is the purpose of it.

Doing us a favor by giving us the opportunity to serve him.

Not someone to argue or match wits with. Nobody ever won an argument with a customer.

A person who brings us his wants. It is our job to handle them profitably to him, and to ourselves.

Each of us is providing customer service to both internal and external customers on a daily basis. And, as a Leader, we need to give our team members the skills and confidence to be Best-in-Class Customer Service Providers.
Lead well … LEAD RIGHT.

Customer Love
Great Stories About Great Service

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Leadership Solution: Work RIGHT

In order for a workplace to be successful, all team members must do the things that successful people do … and they must do them well.

Here are some “Work Right” behaviors that every employee needs to understand and adopt:

  • “Perform with Pride.” Do your very best. Make sure your attitude, behaviors, and the quality of your work reflect someone with self-respect.
  • “Shoulder Your Share.” Meet all of the responsibilities that come with your job. Make sure your coworkers can always count on you to carry your share of the load.
  • “Savor Successes.” Appreciate and celebrate achievements – yours and your teammates’. Be happy for your coworkers when they do well … and let them know it.
  • “Cherish Constructive Criticism.”Appreciate feedback on how you’re doing. Ask for it, accept it, pay attention to it, and use it to improve your performance and results.
  • “Share Your Skills.” Share your knowledge, skills, and talents with others to help them learn and grow. Pass along the gifts you have been given.
  • “Leave a Lasting Legacy.” Care about the reputation you’re building and the legacy you’re leaving at work. Commit to making a positive difference for your teammates, your customers, and your organization through everything you do.

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT,

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Leadership Solution: Leading With Values

Chances are your organization has a set of values, operating principles or organizational expectations. They typically include items such as integrity, customer service, quality, respect, high performance, leadership, innovation etc. etc. And, these characteristics are typically followed by additional words that further describe them.

Values “ground” an organization – providing direction for people that find themselves in ambiguous situations. They are guides for decision-making. When employees encounter situations in which they must choose one course of action from a number of different alternatives, they can turn to their organization’s values for help. Approached from the context of values, decisions often become less complicated and stress-inducing.

When it comes to organizational values, your job as a leader is critically important. You have a two-fold responsibility. First, you need to make sure that everyone understands what the values are and what they mean. Then, you need to guide people in practicing those values in their day-to-day work lives. It is the right thing to do for yourself, your team members and your organization.

What are your organizations core values? Comment below and let us know!

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT,

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Leadership Solution: Leading With Values

Chances are your organization has a set of values, operating principles or organizational expectations. They typically include items such as integrity, customer service, quality, respect, high performance, leadership, innovation etc. etc. And, these characteristics are typically followed by additional words that further describe them.

Values “ground” an organization – providing direction for people that find themselves in ambiguous situations. They are guides for decision-making. When employees encounter situations in which they must choose one course of action from a number of different alternatives, they can turn to their organization’s values for help. Approached from the context of values, decisions often become less complicated and stress-inducing.

When it comes to organizational values, your job as a leader is critically important. You have a two-fold responsibility. First, you need to make sure that everyone understands what the values are and what they mean. Then, you need to guide people in practicing those values in their day-to-day work lives. It is the right thing to do for yourself, your team members and your organization.

What are your organizations core values? Comment below and let us know!

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT,

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Leadership Solution: Ensuring Success for All

So often we look at success as a function of mutual exclusiveness where someone wins at the expense of someone else losing! But, in successful organizations today, that is just not the case. We can all achieve success and ensure the success of the organization simultaneously. And, it is the job of the leader on each team to help make that happen.

In the “How To” handbook 180 Ways to Ensure Your Success… And the Success of Your Organization, author Donna Long gives us a full range of tactical and practical techniques and here are a few of my favorites:

  • Pass the baton. Let others occasionally take the lead on tasks and project activities you oversee. Allowing team members to “spread their wings” and “call some of the shots” demonstrates your trust and confidence – two keys for positive relationships.
  • Go beyond your defined job. If you are able to do more than is assigned or expected, take the plunge and get it done. This is a great way to expand your horizons and increase your value as a team member and employee.
  • Measure performance and analyze results. Look for patterns of success, and determine the contributing factors that can be replicated elsewhere. Be sure to include those involved with the areas being measured – and use this as an opportunity to celebrate their successes.
  • Embrace change. Much of the anxiety we experience comes from change that interrupts the normal flow of our lives. It might be getting a new boss, facing reorganization, or receiving a new assignment. Instead of seeing the change as something that negatively upsets your routine, consider the growth opportunity it represents.

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT,

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“Based on your experience, what is it that truly effective and highly respected leaders DO?”

In his powerful new book Hey Leader, Wake Up and Hear the Feedback!, author Eric Harvey included 145 ideas from contributors who answered the following question:

“Based on your experience,
what is it that truly effective and highly respected leaders DO?”

Here are three of my favorite “Wake Up and Hear the Feedback” contributions:

1. Truly effective leaders empower their employees to make decisions. When leaders make all of the small decisions, they have effectively paralyzed themselves by forcing their teams into dependent states. Their teams can very easily become dependent to the point of lacking the confidence to make even the smallest calls. When this happens, a leader’s office becomes a revolving door of constant interruption. He or she has no time to look at the big picture and drive the direction of the team – becoming too caught up in details instead of the direction. Allowing and even requiring a team to make decisions will free up a leader’s time so that he or she can focus on the “forest” instead of the “trees.” Delegating these decisions will also instill a sense of ownership and responsibility in team members and lead to better results and greater accountability on an ongoing basis. ~Jodi Beyer, Odessa, Texas.

2. Listen to the intelligence that lies within the room. Openly encourage your staff to willingly challenge your way of thinking which in turn will encourage growth on a personal and business level. ~Bill Elmer, The Hills District, NSW, Australia

3. The best leaders are ones who think INTENTION FIRST. Motivate your team by describing the intentions behind goals – the purpose, the action steps needed to reach the goals, what results you are working toward, and the attitudes necessary to get the end results. Your team will be more productive when they know the intention first. ~Beth Camille Byram, Coto de Caza, California

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT,

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Leadership Solution: The Power of Teamwork

Teamwork is a function of cooperation, precision and commitment. And, if you have ever seen the Blue Angels in action, you will clearly agree with the importance of these principles. Here is the introduction from The Power of Teamwork by Scott Beare who for four years was a pilot for the Navy’s world renowned Blue Angels.

Lead well … LEAD RIGHT

Excerpted from The Power of Teamwork: Inspired by The Blue Angels

Introduction

You stare through a gold tinted visor, as sweat stings your eyes and blurs your vision. Over the background engine and airflow noise, you hear through your headset, “Up we go, a little more pull!” as you ease back on the stick in the $30 million high performance jet fighter you’re flying.

Your eyes remain glued to the formation of five other aircrafts merely inches away; your ears are tuned in to every word and syllable spoken. Years of training and preparation have taught you to rely on all your senses to make continuous corrections and maintain control of the aircraft as it exceeds 400 miles per hour.

Your muscles become fatigued from fighting the 35 pounds of force you are countering on the stick, and the fluctuations of the g-force imposed on your body throughout the show. You cannot let up. You must burn through the ever present distractions and sensations.

The physical strain doesn’t compare to the mental exertion required. Your blue flight suit is soaked with perspiration from the intense focus required to perform and survive. The aerial maneuvers you perform in a six-plane formation, wing-tip to wing-tip, exceed what other aerobatic pilots struggle to perform solo.

Most people think of the Blue Angels team as six shiny blue and gold F/A-18 Hornets that take to the skies, thrilling millions. But, like all successful organizations, what goes on behind the scenes is what drives the Blue Angels’ success. The dedication of the support personnel and maintenance crew is what keeps these high performance machines in the air.

While I enjoyed the rewards that come with being a Blue Angel pilot, numerous other men and women with advanced skill sets sacrifice countless hours on the road, away from their families, to ensure the team’s success.

To see these dedicated professionals in action, day after day, represents the truepower of teamwork.

The Power of Teamwork

Inspired by The Blue Angels

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