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The Basics of Recognition

Some people call it “positive reinforcement.” Others, a “motivational strategy.” Still others label it “common courtesy” – a sign of appreciation. But most folks refer to it as “RECOGNITION.” And it’s one of the most powerful tools in every manager’s tool box. Here are a few tips for you to consider:

- Remember that gimmicks, gadgets and giveaways can make your recognition efforts fun and memorable. But nothing (I mean NOTHING!) can replace the good, old-fashioned, sincere, look- ‘em-in-the-eye-and-say “thank you.”

- Remember the “Platinum Rule”: Recognize others the way they want to be recognized. Don’t assume that others appreciate the same forms of praise that you do. Successful recognition is in the eye of the receiver, not the giver!

- CELEBRATE SUCCESS! Consider closing meetings and training sessions with discussions about people who exhibit the positive behaviors your organization says are important. Who has recently delivered superior customer service? Who is a role model when it comes to teamwork? Who has made a valuable contribution that deserves our thanks? Ask these questions regularly. You’ll find more than enough positive examples!

- You can increase the impact of your recognition by linking performance to “big picture” end states. Rather than just saying, “Wow, you really handled that well,” try something like: “What you did really enhanced our relationship with a very important client. I’m convinced she will do business with us again soon. And you’re a big reason for that.”

Lead Well … Lead Right,
 The Walk The Talk Team
Today’s Leadership Solution is from the book:
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Positive Leadership Behavior

Let’s face it…we ALL believe in positive leadership behaviors but nothing counts until we behave positive leadership behavior. Here are a few for your consideration:

- Become a Continuous Learning Machine. Set a personal goal to learn something new about your job, about your organization or about your professional discipline every week.

- Learn by Teaching. Volunteer to be an instructor for organizational training programs. You’ll not only develop in-depth knowledge about subjects you prepare to teach, you’ll also be able to help others develop and grow.

- Do your best to avoid the decision-making extremes: Knee-Jerk Reactions (acting too quickly without considering alternatives or all the facts) and Paralysis of Analysis (stalling a decision with too much analysis and research). Remember that no decision is a “no” decision.

Lead Well … Lead Right,

The WalkTheTalk.com Team
144 Ways to Walk The Talk


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How to Resolve Conflicts in a “C.A.L.M” Fashion

How to Resolve Conflicts in a “C.A.L.M” Fashion

CLARIFY THE ISSUE

  •  Think – minimize emotions by dissecting the problem
  •  Answer questions that will clarify the conflict: What am I upset about?
  • What exactly am I feeling? How might I have contributed to the problem? Where might the other person have been “coming from”? Has this happened before or is it a first-time occurrence?
  •  Ignore NON-issues (overreactions on your part)

 

ADDRESS THE PROBLEM

  •  Meet with the other person
  •  Use a non-accusatory opening
  •  Describe what happened, its impact, and how you feel

 

LISTEN TO THE OTHER SIDE

  •  Be open to the other person’s concerns
  •  Employ effective listening techniques
  •  Be sure to listen if you are “the other person”

 

MANAGE YOUR WAY TO RESOLUTION

  •  Gain agreement that a problem exists
  •  Identify each other’s concerns and needs
  •  Explore possible win-win solutions
  •  Agree on a course of action
  •  Determine how missteps will be handled
  •  Close on a positive note

 

From the book:

What To Do When Conflict Happens

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How to Hire and Select the Best of the Best

To ensure you are able to select and hire the best of the best job candidate you must first develop a Three-Dimensional Candidate Profile that outlines the attributes and qualities an ideal candidate will possess. What are the primary duties and responsibilities of the position? What technical knowledge, skills and experience are required? What attitude and personal motivation are desired? What values and working style will fit best within your organization?

A straightforward approach for capturing and organizing this information is to put together a Three-Dimensional Candidate Profile for the position. You break down the job into three dimensions or categories that you are going to use to evaluate candidates.

  • Capability: Technical Knowledge & Skills needed
  • Commitment: Personal Attitude & Motivation needed
  • Chemistry: Key Values & Work Style needed
When gathering input for the candidate profile, consider tapping a variety of resources. The formal job description, of course, is a given. But don’t stop there. Ask supervisors, peers and subordinates for their thoughts regarding the characteristics of an ideal candidate. And don’t forget customers and vendors who will interact regularly with whoever is selected. They can provide valuable insights into desired skills and attributes that may not be mentioned on the official position description.Lead Well … Lead Right,

The WalkTheTalk.com Team

P.S. Would you like to help your friends and colleagues be even more effective and respected leaders?  If so, please forward them this Leadership Solution newsletter and encourage them to sign up.  They will appreciate your assistance. 

 

Three-Dimensional Interviewing

Hiring for Capability, Commitment, and Chemistry

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RESPECT

The mutual commitment of five star teams is driven by three primary factors – the first of which is respect. Team members value and appreciate the inherent worth of each person in the group. While all members may not contribute equally, each is considered equally important. And each is afforded the basic dignity that he or she deserves as a human being. In five star teams, understanding and acceptance is paramount – there’s no room for derogatory humor, insults, backstabbing, or other us vs. them behaviors which are not only disrespectful but also counterproductive.

The second factor that drives commitment to each other is interdependency. Members of five star teams grasp the reality that their personal success is linked to one another’s … that they achieve only when the entire team does. As a result, they are truly motivated to contribute to each other’s success. They back up and support their teammates. They “pinch hit” for coworkers who are under the weather or otherwise unable to give one hundred percent. They build mutual trust through open and honest communication. They cooperate willingly. And they work hard at avoiding things like turf battles, rivalries, and favoritism – all of which do nothing but hamper their ability to get the job done. No one has to remind them that they need each other – they know it. More importantly, they show it!

Finally, the third factor driving mutual commitment has to do with the law ofreciprocity. Members of five star teams are keenly aware that “what goes around comes around.” They know that in order to get things like assistance, support, courtesy, caring, honestly, and the benefit of the doubt, they must be willing to give them as well. And give them they do!

Lead Well … Lead Right,
The WalkTheTalk.com Team

From: Five Star Teamwork

How to Achieve Success … Together!

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RESPECT

The mutual commitment of five star teams is driven by three primary factors – the first of which is respect. Team members value and appreciate the inherent worth of each person in the group. While all members may not contribute equally, each is considered equally important. And each is afforded the basic dignity that he or she deserves as a human being. In five star teams, understanding and acceptance is paramount – there’s no room for derogatory humor, insults, backstabbing, or other us vs. them behaviors which are not only disrespectful but also counterproductive.

The second factor that drives commitment to each other is interdependency. Members of five star teams grasp the reality that their personal success is linked to one another’s … that they achieve only when the entire team does. As a result, they are truly motivated to contribute to each other’s success. They back up and support their teammates. They “pinch hit” for coworkers who are under the weather or otherwise unable to give one hundred percent. They build mutual trust through open and honest communication. They cooperate willingly. And they work hard at avoiding things like turf battles, rivalries, and favoritism – all of which do nothing but hamper their ability to get the job done. No one has to remind them that they need each other – they know it. More importantly, they show it!

Finally, the third factor driving mutual commitment has to do with the law ofreciprocity. Members of five star teams are keenly aware that “what goes around comes around.” They know that in order to get things like assistance, support, courtesy, caring, honestly, and the benefit of the doubt, they must be willing to give them as well. And give them they do!

Lead Well … Lead Right,
The WalkTheTalk.com Team

From: Five Star Teamwork

How to Achieve Success … Together!

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Develop the Habits of Success

Your success in life and work will be determined by the kinds of habits that you develop over time. The habit of setting priorities, overcoming procrastination, and getting on with your most important task is a mental and physical skill. As such, this habit is learnable through practice and repetition, over and over again, until it locks into your subconscious mind and becomes a permanent part of your behavior. Once it becomes a habit, it becomes both automatic and easy to do.

Whenever you complete a task of any size or importance, you feel a surge of energy, enthusiasm, and self-esteem. The more important the completed task, the happier, more confident, and more powerful you feel about yourself and your world.

The completion of an important task triggers the release of endorphins in your brain. These endorphins give you a natural “high.”

The endorphin rush that follows the successful completion of any task makes you feel more positive, personable, creative, and confident. These habits of success are important to each of us but are especially critical for everyone in a leadership position.

Lead Well … Lead Right,
The WalkTheTalk.com Team

Eat That Frog!

21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done In Less Time

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Develop the Habits of Success

Your success in life and work will be determined by the kinds of habits that you develop over time. The habit of setting priorities, overcoming procrastination, and getting on with your most important task is a mental and physical skill. As such, this habit is learnable through practice and repetition, over and over again, until it locks into your subconscious mind and becomes a permanent part of your behavior. Once it becomes a habit, it becomes both automatic and easy to do.

Whenever you complete a task of any size or importance, you feel a surge of energy, enthusiasm, and self-esteem. The more important the completed task, the happier, more confident, and more powerful you feel about yourself and your world.

The completion of an important task triggers the release of endorphins in your brain. These endorphins give you a natural “high.”

The endorphin rush that follows the successful completion of any task makes you feel more positive, personable, creative, and confident. These habits of success are important to each of us but are especially critical for everyone in a leadership position.

Lead Well … Lead Right,
The WalkTheTalk.com Team

Eat That Frog!

21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done In Less Time

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Learn More

Performance Improvement Process

Here is the proven “Positive Discipline” Performance Improvement Process:

  • IDENTIFY the problem using specific descriptions of desired performance vs. actual performance.
  • ANALYZE the severity of the problem by examining its impact, the consequences the employee will face if not corrected, and “past practices” for similar situations.
  • DISCUSS the problem. Gain the employee’s agreement and identify action plans. Inform the employee if formal discipline is involved.
  • DOCUMENT the nature of the problem, the history of the problem, and what was said in the discussion.
  • FOLLOW UP to recognize improvement or take appropriate action if the problem has not been corrected.
Lead Well … Lead Right,

The WalkTheTalk.com Team

Positive Discipline

How To Resolve Tough Performance Problems Quickly … and Permanently

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The Fundamental Aspect of Success

You know there are no secrets to success. Success with anything, success in anything, has one fundamental aspect – effort. To achieve exponential results requires additional effort …sometimes just “one extra degree.” You know this (and if you didn’t, you do now). Take your courses. Read your books. Listen to your audio programs. But take action. Take action with commitment. Then, when you’re ready for exponential results, apply that extra effort. Sometimes you’ll have immediate exponential results and sometimes you’ll realize the benefits of your extra effort much farther down the road. Regardless, in many cases, it may only be that one extra degree of “heat” that gets you ten times the results you were originally attempting to enjoy. Just remember:

at 211 degrees, water is hot.
at 212 degrees, it boils.
and with boiling water, comes steam…
and with steam, you can power a train.

212° the extra degree

How to achieve results beyond your wildest expectations

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