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Your Daily Motivation 3/14/16

 

#5 Choose To Be Less “If-fy”

“Don’t miss out on enjoying the present by wishing “if only” somebody or something else would come your way.”

Found in the book: Stress Is A Choice 

10 Rules to Simplify Your Life

stress is a choice

Guest Post: Madness or Innovation?

Hello Friends,

Today we are featuring a Guest Post from our friend and colleague, Gordon Tredgold. Gordon studied Mathematics at Manchester University. He worked in IT for over 20 years, and is a specialist in Transformational Leadership, Operational Performance Improvement, Organizational Development, Creating Business Value via IT,  and Program and Change Management. We are excited to share him and his work!

If you want more….subscribe to his incredible blog Leadership Principles HERE. Hope his post encourages you to push boundaries and look for innovation in seemingly crazy places!

Lead Well … Lead Right,

The WalkTheTalk.com Team

Madness or Innovation?

Ever hear the  the phrase “there’s method in his madness”? Well what is being referred to here, is something which looked absolutely crazy to start with, but that might actually not be a such bad idea after all. It’s about an approach which no one considered, because in all obviousness, it defies logic and should have no chance of succeeding, but ultimately it succeeds.

One of my favourite example of this comes from Dick Fosbery, who in 1968 won the Olympic High Jump Gold Medal using a new technique he invented himself. For the previous 30 or so years the main techniques in high jumping were the Straddle, or it’s slight variant called the Western Roll, which had seen very few modifications over that time.

Using this technique Fosbery’s best result was 1m 63cm, a whopping 60cm below the world record, which is not what you would remotely call good, let alone world class. Fosbury unimpressed with his results decided to change his style. He came up with an approach that was extremely unorthodox, and defied logic, he ran towards the bar on a curving run, and as he approached the bar he turned and tried to jump over it backwards.

This approach looked weird to say the least, but in one afternoon, Fosbury improved his personal best by over 15cm, which made him better, it still didn’t make him world class, but in terms of improvement it was a significant step forward. It showed him that there was actually some method in his madness. Fosbury continued to practise and in 1967 he had improved but was still only ranked 61 in the world, by the time the 1968 Olympics came around, he was still a relatively unknown athlete, but he persisted with his method even though it was often ridiculed.

Using his new technique, Fosbury not only won the Olympic gold, but he also set a new world record of 2m 24cm. Nobody was laughing now!

In 1968 Olympics Fosbury was the only person using his technique, which was now called the ‘Fosbury Flop’, but since 1972 no Olympic gold high jump medal has been won using any method but this, and today every competitor uses the Fosbury Flop.

Fosbury was a game changer, he revolutionised his sport,  and he did it by doing the illogical, the weird, introducing madness into his method, and then showing there was method in his madness.

When we cannot make the improvements we need, want or desire, then we often need to look at changing our approach.

Doing things the way you have always done them, and expecting different results, now that’s true madness. We need to open ourselves to new ideas, to new ways of doing things, things that may even look crazy. This is how we drive innovation, not by continuing to do things the way we have always done that, that leads to stagnation.

We need to work smarter, not harder. Harder will only allow us to achieve the best that method has to offer, when what we really should be looking for is a different method, even if at first sight it might look a little mad.

Question: Which innovations inspire you, which at first looked like madness?

 For more from Gordon Tredgold,

CLICK HERE  to check out his blog Leadership Principles.

The Basics of Recognition

Some people call it “positive reinforcement.” Others, a “motivational strategy.” Still others label it “common courtesy” – a sign of appreciation. But most folks refer to it as “RECOGNITION.” And it’s one of the most powerful tools in every manager’s tool box. Here are a few tips for you to consider:

- Remember that gimmicks, gadgets and giveaways can make your recognition efforts fun and memorable. But nothing (I mean NOTHING!) can replace the good, old-fashioned, sincere, look- ‘em-in-the-eye-and-say “thank you.”

- Remember the “Platinum Rule”: Recognize others the way they want to be recognized. Don’t assume that others appreciate the same forms of praise that you do. Successful recognition is in the eye of the receiver, not the giver!

- CELEBRATE SUCCESS! Consider closing meetings and training sessions with discussions about people who exhibit the positive behaviors your organization says are important. Who has recently delivered superior customer service? Who is a role model when it comes to teamwork? Who has made a valuable contribution that deserves our thanks? Ask these questions regularly. You’ll find more than enough positive examples!

- You can increase the impact of your recognition by linking performance to “big picture” end states. Rather than just saying, “Wow, you really handled that well,” try something like: “What you did really enhanced our relationship with a very important client. I’m convinced she will do business with us again soon. And you’re a big reason for that.”

Lead Well … Lead Right,
 The Walk The Talk Team
Today’s Leadership Solution is from the book:
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Positive Leadership Behavior

Let’s face it…we ALL believe in positive leadership behaviors but nothing counts until we behave positive leadership behavior. Here are a few for your consideration:

- Become a Continuous Learning Machine. Set a personal goal to learn something new about your job, about your organization or about your professional discipline every week.

- Learn by Teaching. Volunteer to be an instructor for organizational training programs. You’ll not only develop in-depth knowledge about subjects you prepare to teach, you’ll also be able to help others develop and grow.

- Do your best to avoid the decision-making extremes: Knee-Jerk Reactions (acting too quickly without considering alternatives or all the facts) and Paralysis of Analysis (stalling a decision with too much analysis and research). Remember that no decision is a “no” decision.

Lead Well … Lead Right,

The WalkTheTalk.com Team
144 Ways to Walk The Talk


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How to Resolve Conflicts in a “C.A.L.M” Fashion

How to Resolve Conflicts in a “C.A.L.M” Fashion

CLARIFY THE ISSUE

  •  Think – minimize emotions by dissecting the problem
  •  Answer questions that will clarify the conflict: What am I upset about?
  • What exactly am I feeling? How might I have contributed to the problem? Where might the other person have been “coming from”? Has this happened before or is it a first-time occurrence?
  •  Ignore NON-issues (overreactions on your part)

 

ADDRESS THE PROBLEM

  •  Meet with the other person
  •  Use a non-accusatory opening
  •  Describe what happened, its impact, and how you feel

 

LISTEN TO THE OTHER SIDE

  •  Be open to the other person’s concerns
  •  Employ effective listening techniques
  •  Be sure to listen if you are “the other person”

 

MANAGE YOUR WAY TO RESOLUTION

  •  Gain agreement that a problem exists
  •  Identify each other’s concerns and needs
  •  Explore possible win-win solutions
  •  Agree on a course of action
  •  Determine how missteps will be handled
  •  Close on a positive note

 

From the book:

What To Do When Conflict Happens

CLICK HERE to learn more

How to Hire and Select the Best of the Best

To ensure you are able to select and hire the best of the best job candidate you must first develop a Three-Dimensional Candidate Profile that outlines the attributes and qualities an ideal candidate will possess. What are the primary duties and responsibilities of the position? What technical knowledge, skills and experience are required? What attitude and personal motivation are desired? What values and working style will fit best within your organization?

A straightforward approach for capturing and organizing this information is to put together a Three-Dimensional Candidate Profile for the position. You break down the job into three dimensions or categories that you are going to use to evaluate candidates.

  • Capability: Technical Knowledge & Skills needed
  • Commitment: Personal Attitude & Motivation needed
  • Chemistry: Key Values & Work Style needed
When gathering input for the candidate profile, consider tapping a variety of resources. The formal job description, of course, is a given. But don’t stop there. Ask supervisors, peers and subordinates for their thoughts regarding the characteristics of an ideal candidate. And don’t forget customers and vendors who will interact regularly with whoever is selected. They can provide valuable insights into desired skills and attributes that may not be mentioned on the official position description.Lead Well … Lead Right,

The WalkTheTalk.com Team

P.S. Would you like to help your friends and colleagues be even more effective and respected leaders?  If so, please forward them this Leadership Solution newsletter and encourage them to sign up.  They will appreciate your assistance. 

 

Three-Dimensional Interviewing

Hiring for Capability, Commitment, and Chemistry

Book Image

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RESPECT

The mutual commitment of five star teams is driven by three primary factors – the first of which is respect. Team members value and appreciate the inherent worth of each person in the group. While all members may not contribute equally, each is considered equally important. And each is afforded the basic dignity that he or she deserves as a human being. In five star teams, understanding and acceptance is paramount – there’s no room for derogatory humor, insults, backstabbing, or other us vs. them behaviors which are not only disrespectful but also counterproductive.

The second factor that drives commitment to each other is interdependency. Members of five star teams grasp the reality that their personal success is linked to one another’s … that they achieve only when the entire team does. As a result, they are truly motivated to contribute to each other’s success. They back up and support their teammates. They “pinch hit” for coworkers who are under the weather or otherwise unable to give one hundred percent. They build mutual trust through open and honest communication. They cooperate willingly. And they work hard at avoiding things like turf battles, rivalries, and favoritism – all of which do nothing but hamper their ability to get the job done. No one has to remind them that they need each other – they know it. More importantly, they show it!

Finally, the third factor driving mutual commitment has to do with the law ofreciprocity. Members of five star teams are keenly aware that “what goes around comes around.” They know that in order to get things like assistance, support, courtesy, caring, honestly, and the benefit of the doubt, they must be willing to give them as well. And give them they do!

Lead Well … Lead Right,
The WalkTheTalk.com Team

From: Five Star Teamwork

How to Achieve Success … Together!

Book Image

Learn More

RESPECT

The mutual commitment of five star teams is driven by three primary factors – the first of which is respect. Team members value and appreciate the inherent worth of each person in the group. While all members may not contribute equally, each is considered equally important. And each is afforded the basic dignity that he or she deserves as a human being. In five star teams, understanding and acceptance is paramount – there’s no room for derogatory humor, insults, backstabbing, or other us vs. them behaviors which are not only disrespectful but also counterproductive.

The second factor that drives commitment to each other is interdependency. Members of five star teams grasp the reality that their personal success is linked to one another’s … that they achieve only when the entire team does. As a result, they are truly motivated to contribute to each other’s success. They back up and support their teammates. They “pinch hit” for coworkers who are under the weather or otherwise unable to give one hundred percent. They build mutual trust through open and honest communication. They cooperate willingly. And they work hard at avoiding things like turf battles, rivalries, and favoritism – all of which do nothing but hamper their ability to get the job done. No one has to remind them that they need each other – they know it. More importantly, they show it!

Finally, the third factor driving mutual commitment has to do with the law ofreciprocity. Members of five star teams are keenly aware that “what goes around comes around.” They know that in order to get things like assistance, support, courtesy, caring, honestly, and the benefit of the doubt, they must be willing to give them as well. And give them they do!

Lead Well … Lead Right,
The WalkTheTalk.com Team

From: Five Star Teamwork

How to Achieve Success … Together!

Book Image

Learn More

Develop the Habits of Success

Your success in life and work will be determined by the kinds of habits that you develop over time. The habit of setting priorities, overcoming procrastination, and getting on with your most important task is a mental and physical skill. As such, this habit is learnable through practice and repetition, over and over again, until it locks into your subconscious mind and becomes a permanent part of your behavior. Once it becomes a habit, it becomes both automatic and easy to do.

Whenever you complete a task of any size or importance, you feel a surge of energy, enthusiasm, and self-esteem. The more important the completed task, the happier, more confident, and more powerful you feel about yourself and your world.

The completion of an important task triggers the release of endorphins in your brain. These endorphins give you a natural “high.”

The endorphin rush that follows the successful completion of any task makes you feel more positive, personable, creative, and confident. These habits of success are important to each of us but are especially critical for everyone in a leadership position.

Lead Well … Lead Right,
The WalkTheTalk.com Team

Eat That Frog!

21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done In Less Time

Book Image

Learn More

Develop the Habits of Success

Your success in life and work will be determined by the kinds of habits that you develop over time. The habit of setting priorities, overcoming procrastination, and getting on with your most important task is a mental and physical skill. As such, this habit is learnable through practice and repetition, over and over again, until it locks into your subconscious mind and becomes a permanent part of your behavior. Once it becomes a habit, it becomes both automatic and easy to do.

Whenever you complete a task of any size or importance, you feel a surge of energy, enthusiasm, and self-esteem. The more important the completed task, the happier, more confident, and more powerful you feel about yourself and your world.

The completion of an important task triggers the release of endorphins in your brain. These endorphins give you a natural “high.”

The endorphin rush that follows the successful completion of any task makes you feel more positive, personable, creative, and confident. These habits of success are important to each of us but are especially critical for everyone in a leadership position.

Lead Well … Lead Right,
The WalkTheTalk.com Team

Eat That Frog!

21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done In Less Time

Book Image

Learn More