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Your Daily Motivation 7/13/16

99% of the failures come from people who have the habit of making excuses.

Found in the book:

Habits Die Hard

10 Steps To Building Successful Habits

Habits Die Hard

Your Daily Motivation 7/12/16

Every move we make and every action we take, matters not just for us, but for all of us…and for all time.

Found in- Butterfly Effect- How Your Life Matters

 

Your Daily Motivation 7/11/16

“Your’re only given a little spark of madness.

You mustn’t lose it.”

~Robin Williams

UNCHAIN THE ELEPHANT

Reframe Your Thinking to Unleash Your Potential

Unchain The Elephant

Your Daily Motivation 7/5/16

People often tell me, “You know motivation doesn’t last,” and I say,
“Bathing doesn’t either and that’s why I recommend it daily.”
~Zig Ziglar 


From the book- 
Charging the Human Battery … 50 Ways to Motivate Yourself
Charging The Human Batteryhttp://gallery.mailchimp.com/8f89bce0be7e1813d8ad34042/images/learn_more_red_ls.jpg

Your Daily Motivation 3/14/16

 

#5 Choose To Be Less “If-fy”

“Don’t miss out on enjoying the present by wishing “if only” somebody or something else would come your way.”

Found in the book: Stress Is A Choice 

10 Rules to Simplify Your Life

stress is a choice

Seven Choices for Success and Significance

“Regardless of where you were born or what your financial position in life,” writes Nido Qubein, “the power to affect your own future lies within your own hands.”

Arriving in America from the Middle East at age 17, with little knowledge of English, no connections, and no money, Nido truly understands the power of personal transformation. He has become the author of many best-selling books, one of the most sought after speakers in America, the Chairman of Great Harvest Bread, and the President of High Point University in High Point, North Carolina.

His Seven Choices for Success and Significance can help you Live Life from the Inside Out and start living the life of your dreams. It all starts with the right choices, because the choices you make define the person you become.

I’d like to share one of the choices in Seven Choices for Success and Significance. Enjoy!

Live Inspired,

Michelle Sedas

 

Excerpted from Seven Choices for Success and Significance 
Choose Energy Management Over Time Management
“I recommend you take care of the minutes for the hours will take care of themselves.”
~Lord Chesterfield
Are you obsessed with “managing your time”? Too many people get bogged down with this concept. The truth is that we all have the same 24 hours in a day. If you focus on time, you might be held back by transactional things.
I think in terms of energy.
Is this activity worthy of my energy? 
Why is this shift in emphasis important? Because you could live to be 80, but you could lose your energy at 60. You have 24 hours, but if after five hours you fizzle out, it doesn’t matter if you have another 19 hours. The issue is not the amount of time you have; it’s the amount of energy you have.
Because if you don’t have the energy,
you can’t execute. 
We are all like batteries. Sooner or later, we will lose all our energy. That’s why it’s essential to place your energy in something worthwhile. How do you do that?
Focus on activities that contribute
to the greatest value in your life and do more of those. 
Eliminate the activities that contribute little or no value to your life –
it’s a meaningless investment of one’s energy. 
Here’s an approach that works for me. Regarding energy and time, I think in terms of units – a unit equals five minutes. I never think of an hour – an hour is 12 units.
To use 12 or more units, an activity has to be something that’s really worthy of my energy… and that’s determined by the results it leads to. Here are a few energy management tips I teach in the Freshman Seminar at High Point University.
~Ask people who send you e-mails to limit them to six lines or less with one question per email. I don’t mind if people send me three emails back-to-back because I can answer them quickly with a “yes, no, or maybe.” That’s how I get through 300 e-mails a day and stay in touch with a lot of people.
~I conduct most of my meetings standing up and in the other person’s office. That way I can leave when the mission is accomplished.
~ My desk phone hasn’t rung in 20 years – it rings in my assistant’s office. I delegate and therefore, I don’t get interrupted by phone calls. I rarely have more than a couple of calls a day to return … often from my car.
~Keep time in meetings to a minimum – Attend only meetings that are necessary. Insist on starting on time, getting and sticking to the point, limiting the agenda, and ending on time. Meetings can be big time wasters.
~ Use every minute to pursue your goals – For example, what do you do when you are caught in a traffic jam? Noel Coward didn’t fuss and fume: He took out a piece of paper and wrote his popular song, “I’ll See You Again.” Many successful people keep self-help CDs handy to listen to while they are driving, selected reading materials available to use while waiting for someone, and routine paperwork handy – just to salvage time lost to delays.
Each of us is given 1,440 minutes each day, 168 hours each week, and 8,760 hours every year. What you choose is what you get. Take care of the most valuable resource – not your time, but your energy.

 Today’s Inspiration Comes From:

Seven Choices for Success and Significance

How to Live Life
From the Inside Out

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The 10 Rules for Highly Effective Leadership

The great leaders I’ve known, or have read about, have one simple thing in common: They have developed their leadership styles around their personalities and their values, and in the end, their actions are consistent with what they truly believe.
212° Leaders have made the leap from good to great. They are able to not only rally the troops to committed, purposeful action, but also to create an environment where quality and innovation are the norm, rather than the exception.

212° Leadership was written to make you think, to help you grow, and to provide that extra degree of passion to take your leadership skills from effective to extraordinary! Today, I’d like to share an excerpt from212° Leadership. Enjoy!

Live Inspired,

Michelle Sedas

 

Excerpted from 212° Leadership 
Linus Pauling said, “The way to get a good idea is to get lots of ideas.” Not rocket science, but it works!

The only way to keep a change culture alive, long-term, is to set the stage for innovation. Kevin Kelly, in his book, New Rules for the New Economy said, “Wealth today flows directly from innovation, not optimization. It is not gained by perfecting the known, but by imperfectly seizing the unknown.

Tomorrow comes at us with lightning speed, and your competitive advantage is a fleeting thing. As leaders, we must create an environment that puts innovation front and center. Your people must know it is the key to your company’s survival. You must create a climate that rewards risk and creative effort. Your people must not fear mistakes, but understand that honest mistakes can be life’s main source for learning. So teach them to fail quickly, and often, to enable them to reach the next plateau.

Far too many leaders consider innovation the business equivalent of football’s “Hail Mary” pass or the buzzer-beating three-pointer in basketball. On rare occasions it might work, but “rare occasions,” and “might work” are not the foundation of effective innovation programs. Innovation requires a system, a culture, leadership, and an allocation of resources. Then, it becomes a matter of discipline, commitment and determination.

Tom Peters gets it. He said … “I’ve spent a good part of my life studying economic successes and failures. Above all, I’ve learned that everything takes a back seat to innovation.”

We must never forget…
Change is inevitable, but growth is optional.
Of all U.S. companies, 3M is probably the most famous in creating a culture of innovation, or “disciplined creativity,” as some call it. This didn’t happen by accident. In 1929, founder William McKnight turned innovation into a systematic, reputable process. He rewarded the lone spirits within the company who were “given permission” to fight for their new ideas. The innovative creative culture has fueled many success stories along the way, including the development of Post-It Notes®. Although Post-its failed their initial market test, the 3M scientist who invented the product hooked a core group of users by distributing free samples to the staff at headquarters in Minneapolis. He was allowed to fight for his product’s success, and the rest, as they say, is history.

Today’s Inspiration Comes From:

212° Leadership

The 10 Rules for Highly Effective Leadership

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Choose to Be a Victor

“Life is the sum of all your choices.”
~Albert Camus

When you’re overwhelmed, overworked, and overstressed, do you find it refreshing to remember that stress is really a choice?

That’s a liberating concept because if stress is a choice, you can choose not to have it. Stress Is a Choice, by David Zerfoss, will show you the way with his ten rules to simplify your life. Leading the Zerfoss Group which consults with “think tanks,” major corporations and entrepreneurs, Dave has an innate talent to touch, move and inspire others. In Stress Is a Choice, he’ll inspire you to take a fresh look at how you can simplify your life … and choose less stress.

Today, I’d like to share an excerpt from Stress Is a Choice. 

Live Inspired,

Michelle Sedas
Excerpted from Stress Is a Choice: 10 Rules to Simplify Your Life
Choose to Be a Victor 
One of the most powerful medicines in the world is “choice.” We can choose our attitude, how we react to situations, and with whom we want to share our lives. When illnesses or situations threaten to disrupt our lives, it’s our choice to throw in the towel and become a victim or stand and fight, no matter what the outcome – living the life we have as a victor.

No matter what your circumstances in life, you have a choice in the matter. You, yourself and the person in the mirror. Get it?

How can this be when there are so many horrific cases of past circumstances in so many lives? All kinds of things happen in life. People do things to us, we do things to people, accidents happen, people come into our lives, people go out of our lives. We choose to let these things and people enter our lives or stay in our lives. We also choose our attitude toward them.

When you cease having a choice, you become a “victim.” Whether it’s the changing economy, difficult relationships, or a life-changing accident or illness, we possess the strongest mechanism there is to create a breakthrough: the power of choice. We choose how we react, what we think about and what we become – no matter what our surroundings or circumstances. We also choose how we want others to perceive us, acting and speaking accordingly.

In the fall of 2001, I awakened early one morning to get ready to spend the day at an industry trade show. While shaving, I noticed a lump on the side of my neck. It was not there the day before. I was not feeling ill and in fact, I had just had a physical 30 days earlier, with a healthy diagnosis.

As soon as I got back into town a few days later, I called my family doctor. After explaining my situation, I got an appointment right away. My family doctor took immediate action and sent me to a specialist. After a series of many tests, the diagnosis was lymphoma. That profoundly confronting word – Cancer – had just entered my life.

It was just a few weeks before the Christmas holidays and the oncologist asked if I would like to wait to begin treatments at the start of the New Year. In my normal fashion of attacking a problem head on, I said, “Let’s get to work on beating this thing – right now.” To be frank, I was scared to death. After living a very fast-paced life and conquering many challenges, there is nothing that compares to the confronting nature of the “C” word and the fact that your life may soon be over. A series of questions start reeling in your mind: Will you be there to see all your grandchildren be born, graduate, and get married?

My treatment was set to begin with several months of chemo, followed by a month of radiation treatments. Much to my surprise, when sitting in that chemo chair for the very first time, my best friend, Fred, walked in the room. He had come to be there with me. How do you quantify friendship such as this?

During my treatment process, I encountered many folks with far worse conditions and a much graver prognosis than my own. Life had found a way of quickly putting things into proper perspective. So much so that when people at work would come into my office to tell me they had a problem, my first thought was, “No, you don’t know what a real problem is.”

These folks I met who had much tougher diagnoses than my own became my heroes and offered me true inspiration, Their attitudes demonstrated they had chosen to live life victoriously, even if their life’s duration might be a matter of weeks or months. As one friend once told me, “Every day’s a holiday and every meal’s a picnic.”

With early detection, the wisdom of great doctors, loving support from my family and friends, and overwhelming strength that can only be found in God in times like this, I was very fortunate to beat that cancer. I am pleased to report that I’ve been cancer free ever since the end of those first chemo treatments.

When circumstances, people, or an illness threaten to get you down, remember you always have a choice in how you react and deal with the situation. Choose to confront challenges head on, no matter how serious they are. And choose your friends along the way wisely, too. They’ll be there for you just when you need them; supporting and encouraging you to choose to lead a powerful life – one of a Victor!

Put the Team First

“The greatest accomplishments in life are not achieved by individuals alone, but by proactive people pulling together for a common good. Our mission in life is to offer our gifts to benefit one another, to create mutual gain in the world. This is called TEAMWORK.”

~John J. Murphy

It’s easy for us to say, “We value teamwork.” However, saying it versus committing to the principles to grow it can be two different things. And that’s what Pulling Together is all about! Author John J. Murphy presents the ten rules for high performance teams in an engaging way that everyone can understand. John is a highly recognized author, speaker and management consultant who has helped some of the world’s leading organizations create environments that value and reward teamwork. Today, I’d like to share an excerpt called Rule #1: Put the Team First.
Enjoy!
Excerpted from Pulling Together
Rule #1: Put the Team First
At the center of every high performance team is a common purpose – a mission that rises above and beyond each of the individual team members. To be successful, the team’s interests and needs come first. This requires “we-opic” vision (“What’s in it for we?”), a challenging step up from the common “me-opic” mind-set.Effective team players understand that personal issues and personality differences are secondary to team demands. This does not mean abandoning who you are or giving up your individuality. On the contrary, it means sharing your unique strengths and differences to move the team forward. It is this “we-opic” focus and vision – this cooperation of collective capability – that empowers a team and generates synergy.Cooperation means working together for mutual gain – sharing responsibility for success and failure and covering for one another on a moment’s notice. It does not mean competing with one another at the team’s expense, withholding important data or information to be “one up” on your peers, or submitting to “groupthink” by going along so as not to make waves. These are “rule breakers,” that are direct contradictions to the “team first” mind-set.High performance teams recognize that it takes a joint effort to synergize, generating power above and beyond the collected individuals. It is with this spirit of cooperation that effective teams learn to capitalize on individual strengths and offset individual weaknesses, using diversity as an advantage.Effective teams also understand the importance of establishing cooperative systems, structures, incentives and rewards. We get what we inspect, not what we expect. Think about it. Do you have team job descriptions, team performance reviews and team reward systems? Do you recognize people by pitting them against standards of excellence, or one another? What are you doing to cultivate a team-first, cooperative environment in this competitive, “me-opic” world?

To embrace the team-first rule, make sure your team purpose and priorities are clear. What is your overall mission? What is your game plan? What is expected of each team member? How can each member contribute most effectively? What constants will hold the team together? Then stop and ask yourself, are you putting the team first?

Today’s Inspiration Comes From:

Pulling Together

10 Rules for High Performance Teamwork

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Put the Team First

“The greatest accomplishments in life are not achieved by individuals alone, but by proactive people pulling together for a common good. Our mission in life is to offer our gifts to benefit one another, to create mutual gain in the world. This is called TEAMWORK.”

~John J. Murphy

It’s easy for us to say, “We value teamwork.” However, saying it versus committing to the principles to grow it can be two different things. And that’s what Pulling Together is all about! Author John J. Murphy presents the ten rules for high performance teams in an engaging way that everyone can understand. John is a highly recognized author, speaker and management consultant who has helped some of the world’s leading organizations create environments that value and reward teamwork. Today, I’d like to share an excerpt called Rule #1: Put the Team First.
Enjoy!
Excerpted from Pulling Together
Rule #1: Put the Team First
At the center of every high performance team is a common purpose – a mission that rises above and beyond each of the individual team members. To be successful, the team’s interests and needs come first. This requires “we-opic” vision (“What’s in it for we?”), a challenging step up from the common “me-opic” mind-set.Effective team players understand that personal issues and personality differences are secondary to team demands. This does not mean abandoning who you are or giving up your individuality. On the contrary, it means sharing your unique strengths and differences to move the team forward. It is this “we-opic” focus and vision – this cooperation of collective capability – that empowers a team and generates synergy.Cooperation means working together for mutual gain – sharing responsibility for success and failure and covering for one another on a moment’s notice. It does not mean competing with one another at the team’s expense, withholding important data or information to be “one up” on your peers, or submitting to “groupthink” by going along so as not to make waves. These are “rule breakers,” that are direct contradictions to the “team first” mind-set.High performance teams recognize that it takes a joint effort to synergize, generating power above and beyond the collected individuals. It is with this spirit of cooperation that effective teams learn to capitalize on individual strengths and offset individual weaknesses, using diversity as an advantage.Effective teams also understand the importance of establishing cooperative systems, structures, incentives and rewards. We get what we inspect, not what we expect. Think about it. Do you have team job descriptions, team performance reviews and team reward systems? Do you recognize people by pitting them against standards of excellence, or one another? What are you doing to cultivate a team-first, cooperative environment in this competitive, “me-opic” world?

To embrace the team-first rule, make sure your team purpose and priorities are clear. What is your overall mission? What is your game plan? What is expected of each team member? How can each member contribute most effectively? What constants will hold the team together? Then stop and ask yourself, are you putting the team first?

Today’s Inspiration Comes From:

Pulling Together

10 Rules for High Performance Teamwork

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